Make Pocket Money Equal stickers
Kids in front of a store

Introducing: The ‘Play’ Gap

When does the gender pay gap start, and why? Working with Professor Tim Jay, an educational psychologist at Loughborough University, we discovered that boys get 20% more pocket money every week, while products marketed at girls cost 5% more.

And it doesn’t stop there. Boys and girls earn – and learn – about pocket money in different ways too, which sets them up with different financial literacy skills.

An unequal start for children leads to an unequal future for us all. Let’s Make Pocket Money Equal.

The true Play Gap revealed.

What contributes to the gender pay gap? Turns out, it all starts in childhood.

Download the report
Play gap revealed

The ABC of financial literacy.

Professor Tim Jay suggests a simple three point step that helps parents get to grips with money talk.

Find out more
abc characters

Didn’t catch Make Money Equal?

We’ve been campaigning since 2018, raising awareness about how women are portrayed with, and spoken to, about money.

Read more
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Advice hub:
How can you Make Pocket Money Equal?

Closing the Play Gap together. header image

Closing the Play Gap together.

Professor Tim Jay looks at the impact of the gender pay gap on kids, why we’re campaigning and what you can do to help.

It all starts in the home: why the household economy matters. header image

It all starts in the home: why the household economy matters.

Parents should set an equal example – journalist Kate Carter examines her own efforts.

What does the ‘pink tax’ mean for our daughters? header image

What does the ‘pink tax’ mean for our daughters?

Journalist Louise Burke looks at the impact of that extra 5% – and offers guidance on gender neutral shopping.

Smirks, sweets and the family shop. header image

Smirks, sweets and the family shop.

How should you talk to kids about money? Journalist Kate Carter explores some conversation starters.

Don’t keep daughters in the dark. header image

Don’t keep daughters in the dark.

Normalising lower pay for girls makes it more difficult for them to get pay rises in the future. Here’s how to help.

How Starling parents approach pocket money. header image

How Starling parents approach pocket money.

Looking for ideas to steal? Head this way for expert tips, from the minimum wage rule to digital tools.

How to develop your own confidence when talking to kids about money. header image

How to develop your own confidence when talking to kids about money.

According to our report, men are less confident. Writer Cathy Reay offers tips.

“With SEN kids, throw out traditional workbooks.” header image

“With SEN kids, throw out traditional workbooks.”

Starling business customer, The Maths Mum, explains why a slow burn approach is key in SEN education.

Creating family-wide pocket money strategies. header image

Creating family-wide pocket money strategies.

Advice on how – and why – parents should talk to grandparents and the wider family about giving money.

Tools to try together

Budget Planner

We’ve launched a free, easy-to-use Budget Planner that helps you take control of your money. It only takes 5-10 minutes – remember to factor in pocket money!

Go to Budget Planner
Man filling in budget planner on laptop

Starling Kite takeover challenge.

What happens if you give kids control of the family budget? We asked three podcasters to find out. Dare to try it? Start with our worksheet.

Download the worksheet
Kids takeover childs writing

Pocket Money Budget Sheet

A practical way to get kids thinking ahead to goals – as well as factoring in weekly treats. Stick on the fridge and keep track together!

Download the worksheet
Mother and daughter filling in worksheet

Starling Kite: award-winning debit card and app for kids.

Help kids manage their pocket money and turn their spending into skills. You stay in control in your app while they learn about money. All for £2/month – sign up before 31 December 2022 and the first month is free!

Learn more
Kite card tapped on cardreader
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